• Dr. Lori Cavitt

HerdHealth


Fall 2018


Good day from us here at Henderson Animal Care Hospital! We hope that you've had success putting up your winter hay supply and battling the Army Worms. With Fall beginning, breeding season for many local cow herds is just around the corner. We would like to help you ensure that your cow herd is set up to perform at its full potential, and keep you from losing money on a calf crop due to poor performing bulls, open cows, or diseases infecting your herd. Are you prepared? How can we help you?


Fertility Testing

A smart herd management practice is to have your bulls fertility tested each year before mixing them with your cow herd. When a veterinarian conducts a fertility exam, multiple features of the bull are brought into consideration before he can pass or fail his test. Examples would be: eyes, legs, feet, palpation of the sheath and seminal glands, scrotal size and conformation, body condition, age, and evaluation of semen to check for sperm abnormalities and defects, as well as motility and number, to name a few. By having a fertility exam performed on your bull, you can rest easily knowing he is able to perform the job you need him to do. This can insure that a healthy cow herd produces a desirable pregnancy rate to give you the best return on your investment.


Pregnancy Testing

A good cow man knows everything there is to know about the health of his cow herd, including their pregnancy status. Naturally, we like to think that our cows are taking care of business by being productive. That's not always the case, though. There are many reasons she may be open, including: age, body condition, disease, nutritional issues, or a poor performing bull. Whatever the reason may be, at the end of the day she is open. An open cow in your herd is a good way to lose money. Your veterinarian can assist you in pregnancy testing your cow herd. With the use of ultrasonography, your veterinarian can detect pregnancy in as little as 25 days post exposure. Spending a little money to know the pregnant/not pregnant status of your herd can help save A LOT of money in the long run, as well as insist the decision to cull!


Vaccination

Controlling disease in your herd is as important as anything you can do. The best way to control disease is to prevent it from entering your herd by vaccinating. Your veterinarian can assist you in choosing the best vaccination protocol for your herd. Just as important as vaccinating your herd is choosing the appropriate vaccine. The temperature and the manufacture of the vaccine are very important. If the temperature of a vaccine drops below the temperature stated on the vaccination bottle, the vaccine is not guaranteed, nor is it effective. Contact your veterinarian to discuss the most efficient protocol for your herd. Most veterinarians will assist you in offering the lowest price possible for herd vaccinations.

At Henderson Animal Care Hospital, we have developed a general vaccination protocol that will fit most beef cattle herds. For your convenience, we have included it in this newsletter.


Herd Health Protocol

Recommended by Henderson Animal Care Hospital

All Calves Including Replacement Heifers:

  • Vista 5 + VL5 at weaning

  • Protects against IBR, BVD Types 1+2, PI3, BRSV, Vibrio, and 5 strains of Lepto

  • This is a once yearly vaccination

  • Vision 8 w/ Somnus

  • Protects against Clostridium chauvoei, Septicum, Novyi, Sordellii, Perfrigens Types C+D, haemolyticum (bacillary hemoglobinuria/red water) plus Haemophilus Somnus.

  • This is the “typical” blackleg vaccine

  • This must be boostered in 3-4 weeks for efficacy. Very important for replacement heifers and herd bull calves.

Deworm once at weaning, and again as a yearling or as needed.

  • An oral dewormer as well as a parenteral (injection or pour on) are preferred at the same time.

Heifer Calves 4-12 Months of Age:

One round of Bangs (Brucella abortus) administered by DVM

Cows:

  • Vista 5 + VL5 -

  • This provides the quickest immunity to cows as well as future calves.

  • Because this is a MLV, give 14-60 days PRE-BREEDING (open cows only), unless cows have been exsposed to MLV previously.

  • Do not give to pregnant cows that have never been exposed to the vaccine.

  • If Cows are pregnant or have not been exposed to a modified live vaccine, Use Virashield 6 + VL5

  • Vaccinates against IBR, BVD Types 1+2, PI3, BRSV, Vibrio, and 5 strains of Lepto

  • One round of Vision 8 w/ Somnus

  • Vaccinates against Clostridium chauvoei, Septicum, Novyi, Sordellii, Perfrigens Types C+D, haemolyticum (bacillary hemoglobinuria/red water) plus Haemophilus Somnus

  • “Blackleg”

  • Deworm in the spring with Cydectin Pour-On

  • Deworm in the fall with Cydectin Injectable and Valbazen Oral

Bulls:

  • Vista 5 + VL5

  • Vaccinates against IBR, BVD Types 1+2, PI3, BRSV, Vibrio, and 5 strains of Lepto

  • Vision 8 w/Somnus

  • Vaccinates against Clostridium chauvoei, Septicum, Novyi, Sordellii, Perfrigens Types C+D, haemolyticum (bacillary hemoglobinuria/red water) plus Haemophilus Somnus

  • Deworm in the spring with Cydectin Pour-On

  • Deworm in the fall with Cydectin Injectable and Valbazen Oral

In the months where Face Flies, Horn Flies, Gulf Coast Ticks and Spinose Ear Ticks are a problem they can be controlled for 5 months using Corathon or Cylence Ultra insecticide ear tags. This also helps decrease the incidence of ringworm and pink eye.

This paper is simply a recommendation of an acceptable herd health protocol concerning vaccines and deworming. Proper pasture management, a good feeding and mineral program, and clean water sources must be maintained by the producer to achieve maximum herd health practices. This protocol can be adjusted to fit the individual needs of every producer.




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